Homemade Tamarind Paste

Homemade Tamarind Paste

Ridiculously easy and so full of flavour, you will never go back to shop bought after having tried homemade tamarind paste.

Tamarind paste is used a lot in Indian, Pakistani and Thai cooking, and can also be found in Persian and Arabic cuisines as this mushy brown pulp, as unappealing as it is to look at, is bursting with sweet tangy sourness which gives dishes a very uniquely beautiful taste. You do find pastes available in small jars in the supermarket, but I find them to have a strange artificial flavour to them, and taste almost as bad as they look, whereas with homemade pastes there is a clean freshness and you will have to stop yourself from dunking your spoon (or finger) and licking the stuff off. It really is bizarrely addictive, this tart sweetness!

I recommend buying blocks of seedless wet tamarind, like this one, as its basically concentrated tamarind pulp, but even though it says seedless you will find there are fibres and occasional seeds. This is broken down with some water and then all the beautiful paste is sieved out, and you end up with at least 2 cups of tamarind paste that will last in the fridge for up to 2 months! So, it’s also such great value and you end up with your very own store of delicious sweet tang to add to daals and curries as well as to make quick chutneys and dips. If you are looking for ways to use this beautiful paste, check out my delicious Prawn Pad Thai and refreshing Tamarind Juice.


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Homemade Tamarind Paste

March 14, 2019
: 2 cups (500ml)
: 10 min
: 20 min

Ridiculously easy and so full of flavour, you will never go back to shop bought after having tried homemade tamarind paste.

By:

Ingredients
  • 400g wet tamarind block (preferably seedless)
  • 4 cups (1 litre) water
Directions
  • Step 1 In a large pan add the tamarind block and water. Using a spoon break up the tamarind block. Bring the mixture to boil and then reduce the heat to medium low and cook for 10 – 15 minutes until the water has reduced and the mixture is thick, and the tamarind is soft and has broken down. Every now and then use the back of a spoon to push on the tamarind to help break it down and mix in to the water.
  • Step 2 Sieve the mixture thoroughly. You will end up with the thick concentrated tamarind paste coming out and end up with the seeds, residual fibres and pulp in the sieve. Do not throw this away.
  • Step 3 Return the residual pulp to the pan, add ½ – 1 cup (125ml – 250ml) water and mix thoroughly. Bring mixture to boil and after a minute or 2 turn the heat off.
  • Step 4 Sieve the mixture for a second time. (you can skip the second sieving stage, but there is still so much beautiful paste remaining in the pulp).
  • Step 5 Store the tamarind paste in sterilised glass jars in the fridge for up to 2 months.
  • Step 6 Enjoy x


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